Adirondack Mountain Club:  Marie Lynch Haberl School Outreach Program

Grant Name: Adirondack Mountain Club: Three Seasons of Heart Lake Outreach Program

Project Size: $142,000 annually

Grant Amount: $25,000/year for three years

Strategic Value: Connecting youth with nature, making healthier communities, education

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) is dedicated the conservation, protection, and responsible recreational use of the New York State Preserve, and other parks, wild lands, and waters. ADK offers a variety of educational programs, outdoor skills workshops, and lectures aimed at instilling a love of the natural world in people of all ages.  School outreach programs integrate NYS education standards with environmental education through science, language arts, physical education, the arts, math and history to connect children with the natural world.

Cloudsplitter approved a grant request of $25,000 per year for three years to support and grow the Marie L. Haberl School Outreach Program. The goal of the program is to create significant life experiences, by designing programs centered on developing life-long values about the nature of New York and motivating students to act to protect it.  To facilitate these types of life experiences, students are educated during the three seasons of their academic year. The program is comprised of three components. The first is a classroom presentation highlighting key concepts to introduce students to terms and techniques that will be used to study the seasonal changes. An activity journal is provided to bridge the curriculum between the classroom and field components. Finally, the students arrive at the Heart Lake Program Center for a day of adventure and learning.

Grant Analysis:

Support from Cloudsplitter Foundation has made it possible for hundreds of local fourth-grade students from nine area schools to participate in ADK’s Three Seasons at Heart Lake School Outreach program. This opportunity has been very positive for local students, and for many, provides experiences they otherwise would not have. Evaluations show that students gain the skills necessary for safe outdoor recreation, increase their observation skills, and embrace being outside.